I felt all the feels possible while reading Ties That tether by Jane Igharo

Title – Colours of Hatred

Author – Jane Igharo

Publisher – Berkley

Published – September 29th, 2020.

When a Nigerian woman falls for a man she knows will break her mother’s heart, she must choose between love and her family.

At twelve years old, Azere promised her dying father she would marry a Nigerian man and preserve her culture even after emigrating to Canada. Her mother has been vigilant about helping–forcing–her to stay well within the Nigerian dating pool ever since. But when another match-made-by-mom goes wrong, Azere ends up at a bar, enjoying the company and later sharing the bed of Rafael Castellano, a man who is tall, handsome, and white.

When their one-night stand unexpectedly evolves into something serious, Azere is caught between her growing feelings for Rafael and the compulsive need to please her mother who will never accept a relationship that threatens to dilute Azere’s Nigerian heritage.

Azere can’t help wondering if loving Rafael makes her any less of a Nigerian. Can she be with him without compromising her identity? The answer will either cause Azere to be audacious and fight for her happiness or continue as the compliant daughter.

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Ties that Tether by Jane Igharo which Berkley Publishing gifted me was a rollercoaster! Because I felt all the emotions possible.

My blood boiled red hot, my stomach swirled with disgust, I found myself rolling my eyes in frustration, kissing my teeth at characters and my heart ached for the characters but when I swooned, I felt all the feels hard and because of this strong emotional reaction I enjoyed the story within the pages of the book and I’m completely inspired by Jane Igharo.

The story starts with our female main character on a disastrous date that will do nothing but infuriate you.

Azere is an Edo girl, a Nigerian Canadian whose mother is on her ass to get married to no other than a Nigerian man, especially an Edo one, which the story constantly reminds us as well as hammers down on her culture, which I understand is something a lot of people in diaspora or immigrants in general have to cherish.

From this disastrous date, she meets our male main character who is her love interest Rafael, who by the way is the sweetest dude ever. Although he comes with his own set of issues, one thing this story portrays is how pure his heart and love is. I loved that.

Throw in some usual romance tropes, and the problematic antics of a meddling mother and you have a very dramatic but endearing story. I really loved the romance movies sprinkled all through the book, I can say I’ve only not watched three of them and the way this is used to move along the story was amazing work.

I crackled when I saw the name Dr. Jackson Avery, like I paused to laugh for a minute because I can relate, Dr. Avery is a very fine man.

Ties that Tether is a very interesting book to read, it gave me some insight into how relationships come to play for people in diaspora and their struggles.

Some things were relatable as a Nigerian and many things were not as well, I also loved this about the book because as much as we all like to relate with the books we read, every single person’s reality is different, just because we share a race or culture etc. it doesn’t mean we are singularly minded capisce?

I recommend this lovely romance novel that is out now!

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About the Author

Jane Abieyuwa Igharo was born in Nigeria and immigrated to Canada at the age of twelve. She has a journalism degree from the University of Toronto and works as a communications specialist in Ontario, Canada. She writes about strong, audacious, beautifully flawed Nigerian women much like the ones in her life. When she isn’t writing, she’s watching “Homecoming” for the hundredth time and trying to match Beyoncé’s vocals to no avail. Her debut novel Ties That Tether will be released by Berkley (Penguin Random House) in September 2020.

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